Mathematics

Saddle Surface with Mathematica and Tinkercad

Saddle Surface with Mathematica and Tinkercad 540 406 mathgrrl

A saddle surface is one of the few things I think is really worth 3D printing for Calculus students. There’s something important able to feel the two competing curvatures with your actual hands, instead of just looking at a picture. Since I always like to use the simplest design tools possible, this is a model that I export from Mathematica and then process in the much easier to use design software Tinkercad… // Hacktastic

College-level math exploration in 3D at JMU 3SPACE

College-level math exploration in 3D at JMU 3SPACE 842 640 mathgrrl

This fall’s liberal arts math course at James Madison University used 3D printing and design as the basis for exploring fractals, infinity, and other mathematical curiosities. The students learned Tinkercad, OpenSCAD, and other 3D design tools to construct mathematical objects from scratch, investigated the mathematics of those objects, and presented their work in blog posts and showcases… // Ultimaker Education

Unreasonably large bounds on Reidemeister move sequences

Unreasonably large bounds on Reidemeister move sequences 600 456 mathgrrl

On this episode of My Favorite Theorem, cohosts Evelyn J. Lamb and Kevin Knudson talk with Laura Taalman, a math professor at James Madison University, to raise a glass to a lavishly impractical theorem about knots: a 1998 theorem of Haas and Lagarias that gives unreasonably huge bounds on the length of trivializing sequences of Reidemeister moves… // My Favorite Theorem podcast

Three-Sided Cylinder Coins

Three-Sided Cylinder Coins 628 472 mathgrrl

Today we 3D printed some cylinder coins for students and classrooms to experiment with after watching Matt Parker’s video “How thick is a three-sided coin?”. These fat coins can land on their edges as well as their faces. Try out different thickness-to-diameter ratios and search for the fairest three-sided cylinder coin! Download free 3D-printable files or order cost-optimized prints from Shapeways… // Hacktastic

3D printed fractals at JMU 3SPACE

3D printed fractals at JMU 3SPACE 816 622 mathgrrl

Pioneer Professor Laura Taalman (a.k.a. mathgrrl) reviews a multi-week study of fractals by general education math students in the JMU 3D printing classroom: The James Madison University 3SPACE classroom kicked off the Fall 2017 with 10 new 3D printers and a new 3-credit general education course exploring fractals and four-dimensional representations of objects… // Guest post at Ultimaker Education

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About X, But Were Afraid to Ask (Part 2)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About X, But Were Afraid to Ask (Part 2) 958 727 mathgrrl

It’s math time! Or, at least, designer cheat-sheet time. This week we’ll be giving you the answers you need for deducing side lengths and angles of non-right triangles in your 3D designs. If you’re using professional design software, then you might be able to get all the measurements you need from the design software itself. But sometimes your software programs can’t rescue you… // Column at Shapeways

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About X, But Were Afraid to Ask

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About X, But Were Afraid to Ask 710 528 mathgrrl

Sometimes the specifications for a 3D design require certain length or angle measurements at the outset, which in turn determine other lengths or angles in the design. In other words, some mystery measurement X in your design might be mathematically determined by other measurements whose values you know. But how do you solve for X?… // Column at Shapeways

Giant Spiky Perko Knot

Giant Spiky Perko Knot 640 480 mathgrrl

The Perko Pair is a famous pair of knots that for a long time were thought to be different, but later were famously revealed to be the same by Kenneth Perko in 1973. We created a stylized morph between “Perko A” and “Perko B” by exporting a model from KnotPlot and then adding extrusions to each mesh face in TopMod, then printed the model with an Ultimaker 3 using dissolvable PVA supports… // Hacktastic

Mathematica Brings the Mathematical Bling

Mathematica Brings the Mathematical Bling 710 528 mathgrrl

Math has the best bling. Structure, form, geometry, and symmetry are secret keys to beautiful 3D designs. For example, this stunning Rhombic star earring by Mathematical Creations was created with Wolfram’s powerful software Mathematica. Mathematica 11 added a suite of new 3D printing features including 3D mesh utilities, ready-made 3D printable models, and new tools for thickening models… // Column at Shapeways

Topological Mesh Modeling with TopMod

Topological Mesh Modeling with TopMod 708 534 mathgrrl

Do you want to make beautiful 3D-printable sculptures, jewelry, and lamps? It’s easier than you might think — if you know how to use TopMod. TopMod is a really unique tool to have in your 3D printing toolbox. It specializes in remeshing, wireframing, stellating, and modifying object meshes, and by combining those powerful functions you can quickly create stunning 3D-printable works of art… // Column at Shapeways

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